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Bob Givens Age, Death Cause, Wife, Family, Biography, Facts & More

Bob Givens

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Bio
Real NameRobert Herman Givens
NicknameBob
ProfessionAnimator
Physical Stats & More
Height (approx.)in centimeters - 173 cm
in meters - 1.73 m
in feet inches - 5’ 8”
Weight (approx.)in Kilograms - 60 kg
in Pounds - 132 lbs
Eye ColorHazel-Gray
Hair ColorGray
Personal Life
Date of BirthMarch 2, 1918
Birth PlaceHanson, Kentucky, U.S.
Date of DeathDecember 14, 2017
Place of DeathProvidence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California, United States
Age (at the time of death)99 Years
Death CauseAcute Respiratory Failure
Zodiac sign/Sun signPisces
NationalityAmerican
HometownWillowbrook, California, United States
SchoolAlhambra High School, California, United States
College/UniversityN/A
Educational QualificationA High School Graduate
FamilyFather- Name Not Known (horse breeder and rancher)
Mother- Name Not Known
Brother- 1 (twin)
Sister- Not Known
ReligionNot Known
Ethnicity/RaceWhite American
HobbiesReading, Traveling
Girlfriends, Affairs and More
Sexual OrientationStraight
Marital StatusMarried
Girlfriends/AffairsNot Known
Wife/SpouseCaryl Arlene Smith
Bob Givens With His Wife
Marriage DateYear, 1945
ChildrenSon- Christopher
Daughter- Mariana Givens
Bob Givens With His Daughter

Bob Givens

Some Lesser Known Facts About Bob Givens

  • Did Bob Givens smoke?: Not Known
  • Did Bob Givens drink alcohol?: Not Known
  • He was born as one of two twin boys in Hanson, Kentucky.
  • After graduating from the Alhambra High School in the summer of 1936, he started working as a freelance artist.
  • In 1937, on the recommendation of Hardie Gramatky (his school classmate and Disney staffer), he joined the Walt Disney Studio. Bob Givens Joined Disney
  • At the Disney, he worked as an animation checker on many of their short subjects (especially, Donald Duck). Donald Duck
  • He also worked with the Disney on their first feature-length film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)
  • In 1940, Givens joined Warner Bros. and started working mostly under Chuck Jones and Tex Avery. Bob Givens With His Daughter And Chuck Jones (Extreme Left)
  • At Warner Bros., he was asked to redesign a rabbit character for the cartoon character, A Wild Hare (1940), as it was “too cute” in his existing design.
  • Givens, therefore, came out with the first official design for the rabbit, which would become the famous Bugs Bunny. Bugs Bunny
  • He had to end his initial spell at the studio to join the World War II.  Bob Givens World War II
  • Before he left for the World War, his last cartoon happened to be The Draft Horse (1942).

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  • Givens returned to Warner Bros. in the 1950s and mostly worked as a layout artist; staying with the studio until its 1954 shutdown.
  • When the Warner Bros. studio eventually opened again, unlike many of his co-workers, Givens did not rejoin the studio, and worked at various studios, including the Jack Kinney studio, UPA, and Hanna-Barbera.
  • In the early 1960s, Givens returned for one last spell at Warner Bros., staying with the studio until its final shutdown, and worked as the layout artist on False Hare (1964)- the final cartoon made by the studio.
  • After Warner Bros., Givens worked at DePatie–Freleng Enterprises.
  • He also worked on the Tom and Jerry cartoon produced by Chuck Jones at Sib Tower 12 Productions. Tom and Jerry
  • After that, he worked at the reformed Warner Bros. Animation studio on The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie (1981), Bugs Bunny’s 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales (1982) and Daffy Duck’s Fantastic Island (1983).
  • Givens then worked at Filmation, founded by his long-time friend Lou Scheimer.
  • In the 1990s, once again, he worked with Chuck Jones, handling the production design on the Looney Tunes cartoons. Looney Tunes Cartoons
  • His last animation credit was on 2001’s Timber Wolf, a direct-to-video animated film written and produced by Chuck Jones.

  • After Jone’s death in 2002, Givens retired from active animation work, though he continued giving lectures and animation talks well into his nineties.

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